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Individual

Note: Several articles in this database use different terminology, some refer to pornography use as addiction, others refer to it as compulsive or pathological.

Individual

1.1 How And Why Pornography Can Be Addictive
1.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

CSB stands for compulsive sexual behavior. Pornography use can fit under the umbrella of addiction, when the definition is broadened in such a matter.

  1. Daniel H. Angres and Kathy Bettinardi-Angres, “The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery,” Disease-a-Month 54 (2008): 696-721.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion
Individual
Addiction Compulsion
Individual
Addiction Compulsion
4.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Patrick Carnes, “Addictive Interaction Disorder, Handbook of Addictive Disorders: A Practical Guide to Diagnosis and Treatment,” Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, 2004
  2. Daniel H. Angres and Kathy Bettinardi-Angres. “The disease of addiction: Origins, treatment, and recovery,” Disease-a-Month 54 (2008): 696-721.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion
5.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review.

  1. Kenneth Blum, John G. Cull, Eric R. Braverman, and David E. Comings, “Reward Deficiency Syndrome,” American Scientist 84 (1996):132-145
  2. Daniel H. Angres and Kathy Bettinardi-Angres, “The Disease of Addiction: Origins, Treatment, and Recovery,” Disease-a-Month 54 (2008): 696-721.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Reward Center
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neuroplasticity Reward Center
10.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Guangheng Dong, Jie Huang, and Xiaoxia Du, “Enhanced Reward Sensitivity and Decreased Loss Sensitivity in Internet Addicts: An fMRI Study During a Guessing Task,” Journal of Psychiatric Research 45, no. 11 (2011): 1525–29.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neuroplasticity Reward Center
11.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. Valerie Voon, Thomas Mole, Paula Banca, Laura Porter, Laurel Morris, Simon Mitchell, Tatyana Lapa, et al., “Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours.” PLOS ONE 9, no. 7 (2014).
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Neurochemicals Reward Center
13.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. Valerie Voon, Thomas Mole, Paula Banca, Laura Porter, Laurel Morris, Simon Mitchell, Tatyana Lapa, et al., “Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours,” PLOS ONE 9, no. 7 (2014).
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Reward Center
Individual
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Reward Center
15.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Although the Voon study suggests a connection between pornography use and addiction, caution should be used in interpreting the results because it was unable to follow participants over time. The study does not conclusively prove that pornography use is an addiction. This quote is from an interview in which Dr. Voon talked about the study.

  1. Valerie Voon, Thomas Mole, Paula Banca, Laura Porter, Laurel Morris, Simon Mitchell, Tatyana Lapa, et al., “Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours,” PLOS ONE 9, no. 7 (2014).
  2. “Love Is the Drug, Scientists Find,” The Telegraph, July 11, 2014
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Reward Center
16.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Kuhn, S. & Gallinat, J. (2014). Brain Structure and Functional Connectivity Associated With Pornography Consumption – The Brain on Porn. JAMA Psychiatry. 71(7):827-834.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
17.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Voon, V., Mole, T. B., Banca, P., Porter, L., Morris, L., Mitchell, S., Lapa, T. R., Karr, J., Harrison, N. H., Potenza, M. N., Irvine, M. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours. PLoS ONE 9(7): e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
18.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Mechelmans DJ, Irvine M, Banca P, Porter L, Mitchell S, et al. (2014) Enhanced Attentional Bias towards Sexually Explicit Cues in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours. PLoS ONE 9(8): e105476.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
19.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Seok J-W and Sohn J-H (2015) Neural Substrates of Sexual Desire in Individuals with Problematic Hypersexual Behavior. Front. Behav. Neurosci. 9:321. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00321
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
21.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Klucken, T., Wehrum-Osinsky, S., Schweckendiek, Kruse, O., Stark, R. (2016). Altered Appetitive Conditioning and Neural Connectivity in Subjects With Compulsive Sexual Behavior. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 13 (4), 627–636.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
22.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Gola, M., Wordecha, M., Sescousse, G., Lew-Starowicz, M. Kossowski, B. Wypych, M. Makeig, S., Potenza, M. N., & Marchewka, M. (2016) Can pornography be addictive? An fMRI study of men seeking treatment for problematic pornography use. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/057083
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
26.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Phillips, B., Hajela, R., & Hilton JR, D. L. (2015) Sex Addiction as a Disease: Evidence for Assessment, Diagnosis, and Response to Critics, Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity: The Journal of Treatment & Prevention, 22:2, 167-192, DOI: 10.1080/10720162.2015.1036184
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
31.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Voon, V., Mole, T. B., Banca, P., Porter, L., Morris, L., Mitchell, S., Lapa, T. R., Karr, J., Harrison, N. H., Potenza, M. N., Irvine, M. (2014). Neural Correlates of Sexual Cue Reactivity in Individuals with and without Compulsive Sexual Behaviours. PLoS ONE 9(7): e102419. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0102419
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
1.2 Prevalence of Compulsive Pornography Use
Note: Understanding the spectrum of prevalence of pornography addiction or compulsion is important when evaluating the research surrounding the impact pornography can have in the brain on an individual level.
1.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. 1 - Jason Carroll, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, Larry J. Nelson, Chad D. Olson, Carolyn McNamara Barry, and Stephanie D. Madsen, “Generation XXX: Pornography Acceptance and Use among Emerging Adults,” Journal of Adolescent Research 23 (2008): 6-30.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Prevalence
2.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Accurately assessing the prevalence of compulsive pornography use can be difficult, as different criteria have been used to diagnose compulsive pornography use.

  1. 1- Alvin Cooper, Coralie R. Scherer, Sylvain C. Boies, and Barry L. Gordon, “Sexuality on the Internet: From Sexual Exploration to Pathological Expression,” Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 30, (1999): 154–164.
  2. Joshua B. Grubbs, Fred Volk, Julie J. Exline & Kenneth I. Pargament, “Internet Pornography Use: Perceived Addiction, Psychological Distress, and the Validation of a Brief Measure,” Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy. 41 no. 1 (2015): 83-106.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Prevalence
3.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Alvin Cooper, David Delmonico, and Ron Burg, “Cybersex Users, Abusers, and Compulsives: New Findings and Implications,” Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity 7, nos. 1 and 2 (2000): 5-29.
  2. Alvin Cooper, Janet Morahan-Martin, Robin M. Mathy, and Marlene Maheu. “Toward an Increased Understanding of User Demographics in Online Sexual Activities,” Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 28 (2002): 105-129.
  3. Steve Sussman, Nadre Lisha, and Mark Griffiths, “Prevalence of the Addictions: A problem of the Majority or the Minority?” Evaluation Health Professional. 2011; 34(1): 3-56.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion
1.3 Understanding the Brain’s Reward Center
Individual
Neuroplasticity Reward Center
Individual
Neuroplasticity Reward Center
4.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

The lack of prolactin released from pornography use supports the notion that while pornography may bring excitation and wanting, it is less likely to satisfy.

  1. Stuart Brody and Tillmann H.C. Kruger, “The Post-Orgasmic Prolactin Increase Following Intercourse is Greater than Following Masturbation and Suggests Greater Satiety,” Biological Psychology 71 (2006): 312-315.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Neurochemicals Reward Center
8.
  1. Max Miller, “Big Think Interview with Adam Kepecs,” BigThink.com, August 20, 2010, http://bigthink.com/videos/big-think¬interview¬with¬adam¬kepecs.
Individual
Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
9.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. David H. Barlow, David K. Sakheim, and J. Gayle Beck, “Anxiety Increases Sexual Arousal,” Journal of Abnormal Psychology 92, no. 1 (1983): 49–54.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
10.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Bianca C. Wittmann, Nico Bunzeck, Raymond J. Dolan, and Emrah Düzel, “Anticipation of Novelty Recruits Reward System and Hippocampus While Promoting Recollection,” NeuroImage 38, nos. 1–9 (2007): 194–202.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Neurochemicals Reward Center
11.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Ruth M. Krebs, Dorathee Heipertz, Hartmut Schütze, and Emrah Duzel. “Novelty Increases the Mesolimbic Functional Connectivity of the Substantia Nigra/Ventral Tegmental Area (SN/VTA) During Reward Anticipation: Evidence from High¬Resolution fMRI,” NeuroImage 58, no. 2 (2011): 647–655.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity Reward Center
12.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review. Although this article does not specifically address pornography, its theory suggests that early experiences with arousal from watching pornography may result in crystalizing sexual preferences based on the content being viewed.

  1. James G. Pfaus, “Who, What, Where, When (and Maybe Even Why)? How the Experience of Sexual Reward Connects Sexual Desire, Preference, and Performance,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 41 (2012): 31–62.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Arousal Template Neurochemicals Neuroplasticity
1.4 Sexual Conditioning
2.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review. Although this source does not specifically talk about pornography, it suggests that the feelings of arousal pornography creates can build new brain maps for the user thinks is sexy and what to expect from his or her sexual partner.

  1. James G. Pfaus, “Who, What, Where, When (and Maybe Even Why)? How the Experience of Sexual Reward Connects Sexual Desire, Preference, and Performance,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 41 (2012): 31–62.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Arousal Template Sexual Conditioning
4.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional. Although early use of pornography was associated with more child pornography and bestiality, we note that the percentage of the sample who reported using such materials was relatively small, as 8.6% reported using bestiality, and 5.2% reported using child pornography. This suggests that while early pornography use is likely a factor in consuming deviant pornography, there are likely a variety of other important factors as well that lead to deviant pornography use.

  1. Kathryn C. Seigfried ¬Spellar and Marcus K. Rogers “Does Deviant Pornography Use Follow a Guttman-Like Progression?” Computers in Human Behavior 29, no. 5 (2013): 1997–2003.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Child Pornography Sexual Conditioning
Individual
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Sexual Conditioning Sexual Scripts
1.5 Mental & Emotional Health
1.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. Michael E. Levin, Jason Lillis, and Steven C. Hayes, “When is Online Pornography Viewing Problematic Among College Males? Examining the Moderating Role of Experiential Avoidance,” Sexual Addiction & Compulsivity 19, no. 3 (2012): 168–80.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Anxiety Depression Mental/Emotional Health
2.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. James B. Weaver, Stephanie Sargent Weaver, Darren Mays, Gary L. Hopkins, Wendi Kannenberg, and Duane McBride, “Mental- and Physical-Health Indicators and Sexually Explicit Media Use Behavior by Adults,” Journal of Sexual Medicine 8, no. 3 (2011): 764–72.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
6.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Joshua B. Grubbs, Julie J. Exline, Kenneth I. Pargament, Joshua N. Hook, and Robert D. Carlisle, “Transgression as Addiction: Religiosity and Moral Disapproval as Predictors of Perceived Addiction to Pornography,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 44 (2015): 125-136.
  2. Joshua B. Grubbs, Nicholas Stauner, Julie J. Exline, Kenneth I. Pargament, and Matthew J. Linberg, “Perceived Addiction to Internet Pornography and Psychological Distress: Examining Relationships Concurrently and Over Time,” Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 29 No. 4 (2015): 1056-1067.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
7.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Joshua B. Grubbs, Nicholas Stauner, Julie J. Exline, Kenneth I. Pargament, and Matthew J. Linberg, “Perceived Addiction to Internet Pornography and Psychological Distress: Examining Relationships Concurrently and Over Time,” Psychology of Addictive Behaviors 29 No. 4 (2015): 1056-1067.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Anxiety Depression Mental/Emotional Health
8.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. Joshua B. Grubbs, Julie J. Exline, Kenneth I. Pargament, Joshua N. Hook, and Robert D. Carlisle, “Transgression as Addiction: Religiosity and Moral Disapproval as Predictors of Perceived Addiction to Pornography,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 44 (2015): 125-136.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Mental/Emotional Health Religiosity
9.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional.

  1. Larry J. Nelson, Laura M. Padilla-Walker, and Jason S. Carroll, “’I believe it is Wrong but I Still Do It’: A Comparison of Religious Young Men Who Do Versus Do Not Use Pornography,” Psychology of Religion and Spirituality 2 No. 3 (2010): 136-147.
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health Religiosity
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
Individual
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
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Relationships

Relationships

2.1 Expectations of Sexuality
3.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Deborah L. Tolman, Janna L. Kim, Deborah Schooler, and C. Lynn Sorsoli, “Rethinking the Associations between Television Viewing and Adolescent Sexuality Development: Bringing Gender into Focus,” Journal of Adolescent Health 40, no. 1 (2007): 84 e9-16.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Sexual Conditioning Sexual Scripts
5.
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review.

  1. Mary Anne Layden, “Pornography and Violence: A New Look at the Research,” in The Social Costs of Pornography, edited by James R. Stoner Jr. and Donna M. Hughes, 57–68. Princeton, New Jersey: Witherspoon Institute, 2010.
Relationships
Sexual Conditioning Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Arousal Template Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Sexual Scripts
11.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review.

  1. Ana J. Bridges, “Pornography’s Effects on Interpersonal Relationships,” in The Social Costs of Pornography, edited by James R. Stoner Jr. and Donna M. Hughes, 89–110. Princeton, New Jersey: Witherspoon Institute, 2010.
  2. 1—Ramesh Lakshmi-Ratan and Easwar Iyer, “Similarity Analysis of Cognitive Scripts,” Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science 16, no. 2 (1988): 36–42.
  3. 2— Hans-Bernd Brosius, James B. Weaver III, Joachim F. Staab, “Exploring the Social and Sexual ‘Reality’ of Contemporary Pornography,” Journal of Sex Research 30, no. 2 (1993): 161–70.
  4. 3— Donald L. Mosher and Paula MacIan, “College Men and Women Respond to X-Rated Videos Intended for Male or Female Audiences: Gender and Sexual Scripts,” Journal of Sex Research 31, no. 2 (1994): 99–112.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
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Editor's Note

Authors’ interpretation of the results.

  1. John A. Hunter, Aurelio J. Figueredo, and Neil M. Malamuth, “Developmental Pathways into Social and Sexual Deviance,” Journal of Family Violence 25 (2010): 141–148.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction Sexual Scripts
16.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Experimental.

  1. Jennifer Stevens Aubrey, K. Megan Hopper, and Wanjiru G. Mbure, “Check That Body! The Effects of Sexually Objectifying Music Videos on College Men’s Sexual Beliefs,” Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media 55, no. 3 (2011): 360–379.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Violence
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
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Sexual Scripts
24.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Scott R. Braithwaite, Sean C. Aaron, Krista K. Dowdle, Kersti Spjut, and Frank D. Fincham, “Does Pornography Consumption Increase Participation in Friends With Benefits Relationships?” Sexuality & Culture: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly 19, no. 3 (2015): 513-532.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
Relationships
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Sexual Scripts
Relationships
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Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
29.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Cross-sectional and Longitudinal

  1. Scott R. Braithwaite, Gwen Coulson, Krista Keddington, and Frank D. Fincham, “The Influence of Pornography on Sexual Scripts and Hooking up Among Emerging Adults in College,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 44, no. 1 (2015): 1-13.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
32.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Longitudinal

  1. Paul J. Wright, “Americans’ Attitudes Toward Premarital Sex and Pornography Consumption: A National Panel Analysis,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 44, no. 1 (2015): 89-97.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Scripts
2.2 Partner’s Mental and Emotional Health
Note: The majority of the citations for this section are from clinical or at-risk samples. This means that the research found people who were having distress because of their spouse’s pornography use and asked them to report on their feelings.
10.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Dawn M. Szymanski, Chadra E. Feltman, and Trevor L. Dunn, “Male Partners’ Perceived Pornography Use and Women’s Relational and Psychological Health: The Roles of Trust, Attitudes, and Investment,” Sex Roles 73, no. 5-6 (2015): 187-199.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Perception of Partner
Relationships
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Mental/Emotional Health
6.
In a study conducted using college students, males were randomly assigned to watch one of three films: one of erotica, one of nonsexual news coverage of war, or one of pornography. After the films they were invited to attend a seemingly separate experiment in which they were paired with a female and asked to work on a problem-solving task. They were filmed while solving the problem, and researchers coded the taped interactions for eye gaze, interruptions, touch, unwanted sexual remarks, and disregard of a partner’s suggestions. Those participants who have viewed the sexually explicit films (erotica and pornography) exhibited more dominant behaviors, touched their female partners for longer periods of time, and ignored their partner’s ideas and suggestions more often than those who had watched the news coverage video. Men who had viewed the pornography video interrupted their partners more often and showed more anxious behaviors than those who had watched one of the other two videos. The researchers also looked at the female partners’ behaviors and found that even though the women were unaware that their partners had watched the films, their behavior correlated highly with their male partner’s behavior. Women who were partnered with men who had viewed either of the sexually explicit films exhibited similar levels of anxiety, physical proximity, partner touch, and gazing as their male partners, suggesting that women partners of porn users can be negatively affected by their partner’s use of pornography even when they aren’t aware of said use.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Anthony Mulac, Laura Jansma, and Daniel Linz, “Men’s Behavior Toward Women After Viewing Sexually Explicit Films: Degradation Makes a Difference,” Communication Monographs 69, no. 4 (2002): 311–328.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
7.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Eunjung Ryu, “Spousal Use of Pornography and Its Clinical Significance for Asian-American Women: Korean Women as an Illustration,” Journal of Feminist Family Therapy 16, no. 4 (2004): 75–89.
  2. Janet Hinson Shope, “When Words Are Not Enough: The Search for the Effect of Pornography on Abused Women,” Violence Against Women 10, no. 1 (2004): 56–72.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion Mental/Emotional Health Objectification
9.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Destin Stewart and Dawn Szymanski, “Young Adult Women’s Reports of Their Male Romantic Partner’s Pornography Use as a Correlate of their Psychological distress, relationship quality, and Sexual Satisfaction,” Sex Roles 67 (2012): 257–271.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Mental/Emotional Health Sexual Satisfaction
2.3 Perceptions of Partners
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Objectification Perception of Partner
Relationships
Perception of Partner
5.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Elisabet Haggstrom-Nordin, Jonas Sandberg, Ulf Hanson, and T. Tyden, “’It’s Everywhere!’ Young Swedish People’s Thoughts and Reflections about Pornography,” Scandinavian Journal of Caring Science 20 (2006): 386–393.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Perception of Partner
2.4 Sexual Satisfaction
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction Sexual Scripts
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction Sexual Scripts
4.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Cameron C. Brown, Jason S. Carroll, Jeremy B. Yorgason, Dean M. Busby, Brian J. Willoughby, and Jeffry H. Larson, “A Common-fate Analysis of Pornography Acceptance, Use, and Sexual Satisfaction among Heterosexual Married Couples,” Archives of Sexual Behavior (2016) doi:10.1007/s10508-016-0732-4
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Sexual Satisfaction
2.5 Objectification
2.
  1. Pamela Paul, “From Pornography to Porno to Porn: How Porn Became the Norm,” in The Social Costs of Pornography, edited by James R. Stoner Jr. and Donna M. Hughes, 3–20. Princeton, New Jersey: Witherspoon Institute, 2010.
Relationships
Objectification
Relationships
Objectification
4.
  1. Gary Brooks (as quoted in Pamela Paul, “From Pornography to Porno to Porn: How Porn Became the Norm,” in The Social Costs of Pornography, edited by James R. Stoner Jr. and Donna M. Hughes, 3–20. Princeton, New Jersey: Witherspoon Institute, 2010.
Relationships
Objectification
6.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Correlational

  1. Paul J. Wright and Robert S. Tokunaga, “Men’s Objectifying Media Consumption, Objectification of Women, and Attitudes Supportive of Violence against Women,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 45, no. 4 (2016): 955-964.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Objectification Violence
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Objectification
2.6 Relationship Quality
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
Addiction Compulsion
6.
PR Peer Reviewed
Editor's Note

Theoretical/Review.

  1. Kyler Rasmussen, “A Historical and Empirical Review of Pornography and Romantic Relationships: Implications for Family Researchers,” Journal of Family Theory & Review 8, no. 2 (2016): 173-191.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
10.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Brian J. Willoughby, Jason S. Carroll, Dean M. Busby, and Cameron C. Brown, “Differences in Pornography Use Among Couples: Associations with Satisfaction, Stability, and Relationship Processes,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 45, no. 1 (2016): 145-158.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed
11.
PR Peer Reviewed
  1. Brian J. Willoughby, Jason S. Carroll, Dean M. Busby, and Cameron C. Brown, “Differences in Pornography Use Among Couples: Associations with Satisfaction, Stability, and Relationship Processes,” Archives of Sexual Behavior 45, no. 1 (2016): 145-158.
Relationships
Peer Reviewed